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Costume Recycling

Ever wondered what happened to some of the T-Bag costumes?
Raymond Childe, the costume designer for the show was given a very tight budget to work on. This meant that he would often have to find ways of stretching his budget, meaning that some of the costumes were re-used, or, sadly, re-cut for other things. If you watch the show carefully, you can often see whole costumes that have been re-used, or sometimes bits that have been cannibalised for parts of later costumes. This page shows some of the costumes in their various incarnations during the run of the series.

T-Bag's Pearl Dress Earrings

 

These lovely earrings were part of Tabatha's original costume, and were part of the set that went with the choker.

They were also used with the "Lady in Red" costume from episode 2 of "Pearls".

 

Once the Pearl Dress was finished with, however, they were re-used in "Sunstones of Montezuma" for T-Bag's "Josephine" dress, and I think that they remained with that dress.

Long John Sylvia's outfit

 This costume made regular appearances throughout the show. It was first seen in episode 7 of "Strikes Again" worn by Jan Hunt.

It made its second appearance in "Bounces Back" as Mrs. Merry's pirate disguise. Jan Hunt was also in this episode, but didn't wear the costume this time!

It's third appearance was hanging up in episode 9 of "Revenge" as part of the costumes of Will Wagadagger's troupe of actors.

It's final appearance was as Rum Barbara's costume in "Rings of Olympus".

Tallulah Bag's Black Star Dress Cloak

 The original cloak was worn by Elizabeth Estensen in episode 10 of "Revenge", where Tallulah is ultimately destroyed.

Only the collar of this cloak was seen again in episode 10 of "Sunstones" as part of Georgina Hale's cloak, where Tabatha is destroyed by Kit Bag.

Tallulah Bag's Black Star Dress

 This dress made two obvious appearances. The first was in "Turn On To T-Bag" episode 10.

The second was in "Revenge" episode 10. For the latter appearance, the a black star cloak was added, and the tiara that was used with it originally was omitted in favour of the one that went with the purple version of this dress.

Tallulah Bag's Black Star Dress Tiara

 This tiara was seen originally in episode 10 of "Turn on to T-Bag" with the Black Star Dress.

It was later seen the same year in "T-Bag's Christmas Cracker" in the very last shot, where T-Bag has been turned into the fairy on the top of the Christmas Tree. The Christmas special would have been filmed in the same run as "Turn on to T-Bag" (I recall Kellie Bright and John Hasler mentioning that they would film the series and the special in the summer the year before they were broadcast), so whether the tiara was designed for the fairy costume or the Black Star Dress is a mystery.

Tallulah Bag's Fairy Costume

 This costume was used in the last shot of "Christmas Cracker".

It was later seen again in "Christmas Ding-Dong" worn at the climax of the opera sequence by Maria.

The dress's earrings were given a new lease of life as those to acompany Tallulah's Purple Star Dress. I think the necklace remained with the dress.

 

Vanity Bag's Cloak

 This was originally part of Vanity Bag's outfit in "Ding-Dong".

It was later seen in episode 3 of "Rings" where T-Bag is trying to solve the puzzle in the locket with Grizzly McMoose.

Tallulah Bag's Red Night Dress

 The night dress worn by Tallulah from "Turn on to T-Bag" right the way through to "Revenge of the T-Set" was a red satin affair with a gold polka-dot embroidered tulle overlay with ruffled neckline and cuffs.

The overlay was removed, it's sleeves were removed, the cuffs were made into shoulder ruffles and hey-presto! We have Tabatha's dressing gown which went with her purple nightie in all of her series.

High T-Lady's Bracelet

 The High T-Lady sported two bracets with large gold flowers on them, onto which the drapes of her robe were attached.

These were later seen on the wrists of Tabatha in episode 1 of "Rings" as she attempts to steal the rings from Athena disguised as a goddess.